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Radio Herrijzend Nederland
The Netherlands Revived

Radio Herrijzend Nederland (English: The Netherlands Revived) 1 was a Dutch World War II (WWII) radio station that broadcasted from 1944 to 1946 from Eindhoven (Netherlands), at a time when the country was still (partly) occupied by Nazi-Germany. The transmitter had secretly been built during the war at Philips, under the eyes of the German occupant [1]. Following the liberation of Eindhoven on 18 September 1944, the station made its first broadcast on 3 October of that year.


The station aired its programs three times every day on 420 metre (714 kHz). When part of the country was still occupied, the station tried to encourage the population and counter the German propaganda. On 5 May 1945 it aired the news of the German capitulation. After the liberation of the country, it remained active until the transmissions of the regular broadcasters in Hil­versum were resumed. Radio Herrijzend Nederland made its last broadcast on 19 January 1946 [3]. 2

  1. Literally translated: Radio Resurrected Netherlands.
  2. The transmitter in Eindhoven broadcasted until 11 November 1945. After that dat – until 19 January 1946 – the programs were still made in Eindhoven, but were broadcast by other transmitters [3].

Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].
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Radio Herrijzend Nederland. Unknown photographer - public domain. Obtained from [7].

Audio
The sound clip below contains the broadcast of Radio Herrijzend Nederland of 4 November 1944 – the first transmission from its mobile broadcast van – from the city of Tilburg, ~ 30 km north-west of Eindhoven. A large number of recorded broadcasts are available on SoundCloud [6].

Coded messages
Like Radio Oranje, the broadcasts of Radio Herrijzend Nederland (RHN) were not only used for providing news, but also used for sending coded messages to resistance groups in the occupied part of the Netherlands. Below are several examples of such messages, issued by the Dutch intelligence service BI in London (later: Eindhoven) as well as by military commanders in the field.

Heinz to Anton: Stay where you are [1]

This message comes directly from Lt. Kol J.M. (Jan) Somer — the head of the Dutch intelligence service BI in London — requesting the message Heinz voor Anton: blijf waar je bent (English: Heinz to Anton: Stay where you are) to be broadcast on 26 October 1944 at 12:00 and 20:00. After WWII, Jan Somer became one of the founders of the Dutch Stay-Behind Organisation O&I.


Nobody plays Queen of Clubs [1]

The message above is a request to the Dutch intelligence service BI — which was located in Eindhoven at that moment — to broadcast the message Niemand speelt Klaverenvrouw (English: Nobody plays Queen of Clubs) for the benefit of two persons of a resistance group who had recently escaped from the city of Venlo, which was still under occupation at the time.


1234 carrots are ripe [2]

This message was issued on 2 February 1945, and asks for the message 1234 wortelen zijn rijp (English: 1234 carrots are ripe) to be broadcast via Radio Herrijzend Nederland. In this case, the purpose of the message is unclear, but it is stated that it is based on 'pragmatic considerations'.

Heinz to Anton: Stay where you are [1]
Nobody plays Queen of Clubs [1]
1234 carrots are ripe [2]
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Heinz to Anton: Stay where you are [1]
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Nobody plays Queen of Clubs [1]
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1234 carrots are ripe [2]

Specifications
Schedule
  • 7:00 - 9:30
  • 12:00 - 13:30
  • 17:00 - 22:15
Personnel
  • Joop Acda
  • Philips Bloemendal
  • Henk van den Broek
  • Max Dendermonde
  • Arie Kleywegt
  • Fred Knol
  • Joop Landré
  • Kees Middelhoff
  • Karel Nort
  • Netty Rosenfeld
  • Tony Schifferstein
  • George Sluizer
  • Frits Thors
  • Sjoerd de Vrije
  • Gabri de Wagt
Transmitters
Station From To Frequency Location Power
HN-1 3 Oct 1944 17 Dec 1944 420 m (714 kHz) Eindhoven ?
HN-1 17 Dec 1944 24 Dec 1944 435 m (690 kHz) Eindhoven ?
HN-1 24 Dec 1944 11 Jul 1945 437 m (686 kHz) Eindhoven ?
HN-2 5 May 1945 Sep 1945 245.5 m (1222 kHz) The Hague ?
HN-3 7 May 1945 Oct 1945 300.5 m (998 kHz) 1 Ruinerwold 2.5 kW
HILV-2 Jun 1945 19 Jan 1946 301.5 m (995 kHz) Hilversum 50 kW 2
  1. Initially on 430 m (697 kHz), but after interference from a station in Rennes (France), changed to 300.5 m .
  2. 50 kW became availaable in August 1945 [3].

Timeline
The diagram below shows the history of the transmitters of Radio Herrijzend Nederland (HN) in blue. The diagram is based on an article by Gidi Verheijen in RHT of 2017 [3]. At the left is Radio Oranje, that aired its programs via the BBC in London. The first HN transmitter (HN-1) started broadcasting from Eindhoven on 3 October 1944, shortly after the liberation of that city. A few days before the full liberation of the country, Radio Oranje in London terminated its service.


Immediately after the full liberation of the country, the PTT adds an temporary transmitter in The Hague (HN-2) that broadcasts its own program, but also relays the programs of HN-1. A few days later, a mobile transmitter is added in the north-east part of the country (HN-3). This station makes its own programs, but also relays the programs of HN-1 and (from June 1945) HILV-2.

In June 1945, the programs of HN-1 are also broadcast via the national station Hilversum 2 (HILV-2). Shortly afterwards, on 11 July 1945, the broadcasts from Eindhoven are terminated, although the programs still originate there. After the power of HILV-2 has been raised to 60 kW in August 1945, the services of HN-2 and HN-3 are also terminated. Finally, on 19 January 1916, HN broadcasts its last program and the regular broadcast services from Hilversum are resumed.

Locations


External links
References
  1. Wikipedia (Netherlands), Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    Retrieved January 2021.

  2. Instituut voor Beeld en Geluid, Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    Dutch Institute for the Preservation of Sound and Vision.

  3. Gidi Verheijen, Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    Radio Historisch Tijdschrift, 2017, Issue 163-4, pp. 183-189.

  4. Coded messages sent from Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    Nationaal Archief, Ministerie van Defensie in Londen, inv. nr. 2678. 1

  5. Coded message sent from Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    Rijksarchief Limburg. Militair Gezag, 07-E09, 4863-62. 1

  6. Instituut vor Beeld en Geluid, Collection of Broadcasts...
    Hosted on SoundCloud. Retrieved January 2021.

  7. Unknown photographers, Photographs of Radio Herrijzend Nederland
    NIOD, via Oorlogsbronnen.nl. Retrieved January 2021.
  1. Kindly provided by Gidi Verheijen, August 2008 [3].

Further information
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Crypto Museum. Created: Thursday 14 January 2021. Last changed: Sunday, 17 January 2021 - 17:55 CET.
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