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KY-99   MINTERM
Voice and data encryption unit · ANDVT

TSEC/KY-99A (MINTERM) 1 is an Advanced Narrowband Digital Voice Terminal (ANDVT), intro­duced in 1994 by the US National Security Agency (NSA) and manufactured by ITT Industries (ITT). Used for secure voice and data communication over narrow- and wideband radio channels, it is interoperable with the other members of the ANDVT-family and is backward compatible with the wideband KY-57 (VINSON), which it replaces. It is also known as NSN 5810-01-391-0187.

KY-99 has the same form factor as the earlier KY-57. It measures 140 x 77 x 200 mm and weights approx. 2 kg. Power must be provided by a battery or a vehicular adapter (at the rear).

At the front are two standard 6-pin U-229 connectors for AUDIO and DATA respectively. The DATA connector is also used for connection of a key FILL device such as the KYK-13. A com­pa­tible radio set (or wireline adapter) is connec­ted to the 13-pin connector at the front panel. Note that the layout of this connector is different from the RADIO connector of the earlier KY-57.
  

The ANDVT-family was launched in the late-1970s with the introduction of the USC-43 Tactical Terminal (TACTERM). It was based on the NRLs first successful implementation of the LPC-10 vocoder in 1973 [1] and uses SAVILLE as one of its encryption algoritms. The KY-99 (MINTERM) is a miniaturized version of TACTERM. Its design is based on a modular architecure and, compared to TACTERM, has a much reduced size. The KY-99 features full key distribution plus remote key capability (OTAR and OTAD) and was certified for secure traffic up to TOP SECRET (NSA Type 1). It is also compatible with the US secure and jam-resistant military satellite network MILSTAR [9].

Development of the KY-99 was started in the early 1990s, with the first training sessions around 1992 [4]. The design was finalized in 1994, when it was assigned an NSN code. It replaced the narrowband KY-65 (2400 bps, HF) and the wideband KY-57 (16 kbps, VHF/UHF). By 2006, over 40,000 ANDVT units were in operation at the US Navy, Air Force, Army, Allied Forces, NATO and US government agencies, for a unit price of US$ 6207 [2]. In 2013, NSA lauched a modernisation program (VACM) to redesign the interior of the KY-99A. This resulted in the KY-99M drop-in replacement, which is functionally identical to the KY-99A, and was manufactured by Raytheon.

 Sound samples

  1. On this page, the name 'KY-99A' refers to the KY-99A and KY-99M, which are functionally identical.

KY-99 MINTERM
KY-99 MINTERM
Rear view
Front view
KY-99 MINTERM
Front panel with protective caps removed
Connections at the front
Power connector at the rear
A
×
A
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KY-99 MINTERM
A
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KY-99 MINTERM
A
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Rear view
A
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Front view
A
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KY-99 MINTERM
A
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Front panel with protective caps removed
A
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Connections at the front
A
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Power connector at the rear

Features
At the bottom right is the MODE selector. There are 5 modes of operation: Plaintext (PT), Cipher­text (CT), Over-The-Air Re-keying (RK), Off-line and ZEROIZE. Pull the knob and turn it clockwise all the way to delete all cryptographic keys instantly. The rest of the operation is via the green 8-position alphanumeric display at the top right, and the three push-buttons below it (INIT → ↑).


The device is powered via the 6-pin receptacle at the rear. As this connector is incompatible with the standard 5-pin vehicular connector, and because KY-99 is smaller than earlier equipment, an HYP-57 power adapter has to be fitted at the rear of the device. With HYP-57 in place, the device can be fitted in an vehicle mount. In a portable environment, the KY-99 can be powered by a local battery pack that is installed directly to the rear of the KY-99 (instead of the HYP-57).

When in use, any loaded cryptographic KEYs are kept in battery-backed static memory, which can be purged instantly (even when the device is off) by means of the ZEROIZE procedure. At the bottom of the device is a small lid that gives access to the backup battery compartment.

Versions
  • KY-99
    This is the initial version of the KY-99 (MINTERM), which is not backwards compatible with KY-57 and other members of the VINSON family. The KY-99 was manufactured by ITT and was later upgraded to KY-99A by means of an upgrade kit.

  • KY-99A
    This version does not have a lock/unlock function, but has a separate logic that is crypto­graphically compatible with the cryptosystem of KY-57, KY-58 and KY-67 (VINSON) [5]. Note that separate KEYs are needed for ANDVT and VINSON applications. The KY-99A was manufactured by ITT.

  • KY-99M
    By 2013, many of the components used inside the KY-99A had become obsolete, as a result of which maintenance of existing devices had become nearly impossible. Many of the custom chips – made by AMI, Harris and others – were no longer in production. NSA subsequently lauched the VINSON/ANDVT Cryptographic Modernization program (VACM) [6]. In August 2014, the VACM contract was awarded to Raytheon [7]. In December 2016, the US Air Force awarded Raytheon with another five-year contract for US$ 459 million worth of VACM equipment, to be completed in 2021 [8].
Standards
KY-99 can be configured for the following standards:

  • ANDVT (narrowband)
    In this mode the device can be used over 3 kHz wide narrowband radio channels. It uses the LPC-10e vocoder at a rate of 2400 baud, whilst the data is encrypted with the secret SAVILLE algorithm. This is the default mode, in which the device is compatible with other members of the ANDVT-family.

  • VINSON (wideband)
    This is the legacy or wideband mode, in which the device is backward compatible with the earlier VINSON-family, such as the KY-57. In this mode, voice and data are encrypted with SAVILLE and sent at 16 Kb/s using CVSD. It can be used over a 25 kHz channel.
Compatible devices on this website
KY-57 (VINSON) Wide-band Voice and Data Encryption Unit
SINCGARS ICOM compatible radios
DS-102 compatible fill devices
Embeddable COMSEC module
Advanced INFOSEC Machine II
RAILMAN embeddable cryptographic processor with SAVILLE
CYPRIS embeddable cryptographic processor with SAVILLE
 Compatible devices


Setup
The diagram below shows the typical applications for the KY-99A. Depending on the quality of the transmission path, a bandwidth of 3 kHz (narrowband) or 25 kHz (wideband) can be used. On HF radio links, the bandwidth is always limited to 3 kHz, which forces the use of the LPC-10e vocoder. On VHF and UHF line-of-sight (LOS) links, both 3 kHz and 25 kHz can be used. To use the KY-99A over (fixed) land lines, the HYX-57 wireline adapter is required at both ends.

Possible configurations with the KY-99A or KY-99M


Operation
Startup
After turning the device on (with the VOL control), the display briefly shows
ON
, after which it blanks whilst the device performs a self-test. After several seconds, the flashing text
PUSH INIT
appears. Press INIT to continue. The display now shows
CLD STRT
(cold start) after which the text
PUSH INIT
appears twice. Press INIT on each occasion. The display then blanks again for several seconds, after which it is likely that
DEV ERR
appears, followed by
PASS
.

Mode selection
The device is now ready for use. A regular handset with U-229 connector should be connected to the AUDIO port of the KY-99. There are five MODEs of operation, each of which is selected with the rotary dial at the bottom right:

  • PT
    This is the plaintext mode. It should be selected for non-secure (i.e. plain) voice communi­cation. When selecting this mode, the display briefly shows
    PT
    . When transmitting, the display shows
    PT TX
    (Plaintext Transmit).

  • CT
    This is the ciphertext mode. It should be selected for secure voice communication. When no valid KEY is loaded, the display shows
    PT ONLY
    , after which
    PUSH INIT
    starts flashing. Press INIT to continue, and load a valid key via the OFF LINE mode (see below). When a valid KEY has been loaded, the display stays blanks when selecting CT-mode. When transmitting in ANDVT-mode, it shows
    TX CT VC
    (Transmit Ciphertext Voice).
    In VINSON-mode it shows
    TX AV 16
    (Transmit Audio Vinson 16 Kb/s).

  • RK
    This is the re-keying mode. It can only be used when a valid key is loaded.

  • OFF LINE
    In this mode, the unit is off-line and can be configured. There is a range of options and settings, all of which can be edited via the display, using the three circular buttons underneath it. This mode is further described below.

  • Z-ALL
    This mode clears all cryptographic keys and should be used in case of an emergency, e.g. when security is compromised. As per convention, ZEROIZING is a two-step action. Pull-out the MODE-selector and turn it clockwise all the way. All keys are now destroyed and the KY-99 can no longer be used in secure mode until new keys are loaded.

OFF LINE menu
To configure the device, set the MODE-selector to OFF LINE and follow the instructions on the display. Then wait until
TEST
appears. You are now in the top level menu of the OFF LINE mode. Use the → and ↑ buttons to cycle through all possible actions. Note that the displays blanks after several seconds of inactivity. The following sub-menus are available (wraps around at the end):

TEST
CONFIG
INFC
LOCK
DISPLAY
KEYS

Press → or ↑ to cycle through the available options. Press INIT to enter a menu selection. When in a sub-menu, press → and ↑ simultaneously to confirm a setting and return to the parent menu.

  • TEST
    Test display and controls (follow the instructions on the display)
  • CONFIG
    Select between
    ANDVT
    and
    VINSON
    (see below)
  • INFC
    Interface configuration (see below)
  • LOCK
    ?
  • DISPLAY
    Set display brightness in 5 levels (0=off)
  • KEYS
    Load, zeroize or update a key compartment (see below)
Configuration
The
CONFIG
sub-menu is used to select the compatibility mode. The default mode is ANDVT

  • ANDVT
    Narrowband 3 kHz, LPC-10e, 2400 baud
  • VINSON
    Wideband 25 kHz, CVSD, 16 Kb/s (compatible with KY-57)
Note that in ANDVT-mode, the device transmits a 1.5 second preample at the beginning of each transmission. This synchronises the ANDVT device at the other end. The preample is audible through the handset. Do not start speaking before the preample has ended.

Interface configuration
The interface configuration sub-menu (
INFC
) offers the following settings:

  • RD POLL
    Select RED Polarity:
    MARK +
    or
    MARK -
  • DEFAULT
    Restore default settings: INIT NV (initialise non-volatile memory)
  • VERSION
    Read firmware version numbers (see below)
  • LOS
    Select line-of-sight mode:
    OFF
    ,
    ON
  • RADIO
    Set analogue audio level into radio (-21dB to 0dB)
  • BLK DIG
    Configure BLACK data interface (see below)
Configure BLACK data interface
The BLACK data interface sub-menu (
INFC
BLK DIG
) offers the following settings:

  • CLKS
    Clock source:
    INT CLK
    (internal) or
    EXT CLK
    (external)
  • PREAM
    Preample type:
    STAND
    (standard) or
    ENHAN
    (enhanced)
  • MILSTAR
    MILSTAR satellite support:
    OFF
    or
    ON
  • BD CTS
    BLACK data interface Clear To Send:
    OFF
    ,
    ON
  • BD POL
    BLACK data interface polarity:
    MARK +
    or
    MARK -
  • DELAY
    Satellite delay: 135 to 1200 ms
  • TRN SEQ
    True Random Number Sequences: 6, 9, 12, 15, 30, 60
Load, zeroize and update KEYs
The
KEYS
sub-menu offers the following settings:

  • LOAD
    Load key into compartment: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, U
  • ZERO
    Zeroize a single key compartment: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, U
  • ALM TST
    Alarm Crypto Key: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, U
  • UPDATE
    Update key:
    UDT x 00
    (x=1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, U)
To load a key, select
LOAD
, press INIT and select the desired compartment. The key compartment number flashes. Connect a DS-102 compatible FILL device, and initiate the transfer from the FILL device. When the key was loaded successfully, the compartment number stops flashing. Set the MODE selector to CT and start a conversation wait until the message preample has been sent).

Firmware version
The
VERSION
sub-menu can be used to check the version numbers of the firmware loaded in the custom chips and the main processor. Use → to cycle through the list, which looks like this:

  • VP 0257
    Voice Processor version 2.57
  • CM 0097
    Crypto Module version 0.97
  • MP 0440
    Main Processor version 4.40




Parts
KY-99 voice and data encryptor
LAV-25 vehicle mounting plate for KY-57 or KY-99
HYP-57/TSEC power adapter box
Battery box
HYX-57 wireline adapter
Radio cable
Power cable
Fill cable
Military handset H-250/U with U-229 connector (or equivalent)
Backup battery BA-5372 or equivalent
AN/KOI-18 Key Tape Reader
AN/KYK-13 Key Transfer Device
Terminal   KY-99A
The central piece of a MINTERM installation is the KY-99A terminal shown in the image on the right. It can be used as a stand-alone device – with a battery connected at the rear – but also as part of a complete (secure) radio setup, in which case the radio is connected to the RADIO con­nec­tor at the bottom left of the front panel.

The device has the same form factor as the KY-57 (VINSON) which it replaces. Note however that the RADIO connector has a different layout, which means that different cables are required.

  

Vehicle mounting kit   LAV-25
When the KY-99 is used in a vehicle, such as the LAV-25, it might be necessary to install a vehicle mounting plate or bracket as shown in the image on the right. It consists of an LAV-25 upgrade mount (black) with four shock-mounts, on which an MT-4626 mounting base (green) is installed.

The KY-99A can be installed in the green cradle (MA-4626), but only when the HYP-57 power adapter is fitted at the rear. In most vehicles, only the bare cradle is needed. The LAV-25 adapter came with power and radio cables.

  

Power adapter   HYP-57
The HYP-57 power adapter is inherited from the KY-57 era, and converts the 6-pin power connector of the KY-99A to the 5-pin power connector present in most vehicles.

This power adapter is also needed when the KY-99 is to be fitted in the LAV-25 mounting kit or the MA-4626 cradle. A suitable power cable was supplied with the LAV-25/MA-4626 kit.

 Pinout of both connectors

  

Battery box
The battery box shown in the image on the right can be attached to the rear of the KY-99 and offers space for a standard 2 × 12V battery pack such as the BA-590, BA-5590 or equivalent.

These battery packs consists of two 12V batte­ries, both of which are wired individually to the 6-pin connector. This way the equipment can use them eiter in parallel (12V) or series (24V). In the KY-99A they are used in series (24V).

  

Wireline adapter   HYX-57
The HYX-57 wireline adapter allowes two KY-99 units to be interconnected via a 2- or 4-wire telephone line, up to a distance of 16 km (10 miles). In case longer distances were required, multiple HYX-57 units could be cascaded.

 More information
  

Radio cable
A radio set can be connected to the RADIO connector on the front panel of the KY-99, by means of a suitable radio cable, such as the one shown in the image on the right. It has a 13-pin connector at the KY-99 end, and a connector for the radio set at the other end. In most cases this will be a 5- or 6-pin U-229. Both are of the pivoting type, making it easier to guide them.

The cable shown here is for connection of the KY-99 to an RT-1209 radio set.

 Pinout of the radio connector

  

Power cable
The LAV-25 vehicle mount comes with a short 2-wire cable with a 5-pin female connector, as shown in the image on the right. It is used to supply 24V to the KY-99 via the HYP-57.

The white wire (pin A) should be connected to a +24V/DC source, whilst the black wire (pin B) is used for the 0V (ground).

 Pinout of the power connector

  

Fill cable
When connecting a common FILL device — such as the KYK-13 — to the FILL port of the KY-99, a suitable FILL cable should be used, such as the one shown in the image on the right. Note that the cable shown here, has a pivoting connector at one end, making it easier to guide the cable.

This cable has a 6-pin U-229 connector at either end, and is wired straight-through (i.e. 1:1).

 Pinout of the U-229 connector

  

Handset   H-250/U
A regular mulitary handset with U-229 connec­tor, such as the H-250/U shown in the image on the right, should be connected to the AUDIO connector (AUD) at the front panel of the KY-99.

In most cases this will be the handset that was supplied with the radio set.

  

Backup battery   BA-5372
When the KY-99 is switched off, the crypto­graphic keys are retained in memory by means of a 6V backup battery that is installed behind a small panel at the bottom of the device.

In the past, a BA-590 battery was used, but this has since been superceeded by the BA-5590, which is available from several suppliers in the US. Users in other countries may have difficulty sourcing this battery, as it contains Lithium and is not allowed to be shipped by air mail.

 More information

  

Key loader   KOI-18
Cryptographic keys must be loaded into the KY-99 by means of a DS-102 compatible key tape reader, such as the KOI-18 shown in the image on the right, or a key transfer device like the KYK-13 shown below.

The KOI-18 has the advantage that it can transfer key of unlimited length. It works by connecting the KOI-18 to the FILL socket of the KY-99 and pulling an 8-level punched paper tape through the reader. The key is not stored in the KOI-18 as it does not have a memory.

 More information

  

Key loader   KYK-13
In most cases, the KOI-18 tape reader shown above was used to load the cryptographic key into a key transfer device like the KYK-13 shown in the image on the right. The KYK-13 can hold up to 6 keys simultaneously, which can then be selected with a 6-position rotary switch at the front of the device.

The KYK-13 was then used to transfer the key(s) to one or more KY-99 devices in the field.

 More information

  

KY-99 parts
KY-99 MINTERM
Power connector at the rear
Connections with protective rubber caps
Connections at the front
Backup battery compartment (closed)
Backup battery compartment (open)
Vehicle mounting plate
Rear view
KY-99A mounted on the LAV-25 vehicle mount
ID plate
Cable guide
ID plate
Battery box for KY-57 or KY-99
Battery box interior
Identification
HYP-57 power adapter (front)
HYP-57 power adapter (rear)
KY-99 with HYP-57 power adapter
Radio connection cable
Pivoting connector
Power cable
Power connector
Fill cable
Pivoting connector
H-250/U handset with coiled cable
H-250/U handset
BA-5372 backup battery
BA-5372 backup battery
KOI-18 with open lid
KYK-13 key transfer device
B
×
B
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KY-99 parts
B
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KY-99 MINTERM
B
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Power connector at the rear
B
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Connections with protective rubber caps
B
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Connections at the front
B
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Backup battery compartment (closed)
B
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Backup battery compartment (open)
B
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Vehicle mounting plate
B
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Rear view
B
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KY-99A mounted on the LAV-25 vehicle mount
B
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ID plate
B
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Cable guide
B
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ID plate
B
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Battery box for KY-57 or KY-99
B
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Battery box interior
B
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Identification
B
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HYP-57 power adapter (front)
B
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HYP-57 power adapter (rear)
B
19 / 31
KY-99 with HYP-57 power adapter
B
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Radio connection cable
B
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Pivoting connector
B
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Power cable
B
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Power connector
B
24 / 31
Fill cable
B
25 / 31
Pivoting connector
B
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H-250/U handset with coiled cable
B
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H-250/U handset
B
28 / 31
BA-5372 backup battery
B
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BA-5372 backup battery
B
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KOI-18 with open lid
B
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KYK-13 key transfer device


Interior
The KY-99A is housed in a single-piece die-cast aluminium enclosure that measures 200 × 140 × 77 mm and weights less than 2 kg. The interior can be accessed by removing 12 screws from the top surface, after which the sealed top lid can be removed, as shown in the image above.

Inside the device are eight printed circuit boards (PCBs), three of which are fixed. These are the backplane (fitted at the bottom), the front panel PCB (fitted behind the front panel) and the power input PCB (fitted to the rear panel). The other five boards — marked E-HWA to E-HWE — are all slotted into the backplane. Each of these five boards can be removed by pulling it upwards.

The image on the right shows the E-HWC plug-in board, which is the only board with a red plastic label at the top, marked CCI. This means that it is a Controlled Cryptographic Item (CCI).
  

The E-HWC board holds an 80C31 microcontroller, a PSD411 programmable peripheral unit (probably to emulate synchronous and ansynchronous serial ports) and the CCI marked U-AXM RAILMAN crypto processor. This chip (ON45200) contains a hardware implementation of the SAVILLE encryption algorithm, jointly developed in the late 1960s by GCHQ (UK) and NSA (USA).

Boards E-HWB and E-HWD are very similar and each contain a AMI custom chip (ASIC), a Texas Instruments (TI) TMS320 Digital Signal Processor (DSP) and 64KB of static memory. It is likely that these boards contain the LPC-10e vocoder — used for speech compression on narrowband channels — and the Continuous Variable Slope Delta-modulator (CVSD), that is used on wide­band channels and is compatible with VINSON.

As these two boards are located at either side of the Processor/Crypto CCI board (E-HWC), it is likely that they form the RED/BLACK separation.
  

Below are detailed photographs of each of the plug-in boards. Please note that these boards are from the KY-99A (not KY-99M) and that they contain several custom-made ASICs, most of which are now obsolete. For this reason, a modernisation program (VACM) was started in 2013, which resulted in the KY-99M. Although the KY-99M is functional identical to the KY-99A, it is likely that its interior is completely different and simplified. It is probably build with modern FPGAs.

Plug-in boards
  • E-HWA
    ASIC board
  • E-HWB
    DSP board 1 - RED side
  • E-HWC
    Crypto/processor board (CCI)
  • E-HWD
    DSP board 2 (with tamper switch) - BLACK side
  • E-HWE
    Internal power supply (DC/DC converter)
Top lid removed
Interior - front left view
Interior - front right view
Interior with one card taken from its slot
Interior - top view
E-HWA board
E-HWA board top view
E-HWB board
E-HWB board top view
E-HWC board (CCI)
E-HWC board (CCI) top view
E-HWD board
E-HWD board top view
Tamper switch
E-HWE board
E-HWE board top view
C
×
C
1 / 16
Top lid removed
C
2 / 16
Interior - front left view
C
3 / 16
Interior - front right view
C
4 / 16
Interior with one card taken from its slot
C
5 / 16
Interior - top view
C
6 / 16
E-HWA board
C
7 / 16
E-HWA board top view
C
8 / 16
E-HWB board
C
9 / 16
E-HWB board top view
C
10 / 16
E-HWC board (CCI)
C
11 / 16
E-HWC board (CCI) top view
C
12 / 16
E-HWD board
C
13 / 16
E-HWD board top view
C
14 / 16
Tamper switch
C
15 / 16
E-HWE board
C
16 / 16
E-HWE board top view

Connections
Audio
At the top left of the front panel of the KY-99 is a 6-pin U-229 connector (actually an U-283/U male panel mount) for connection of the audio accessories, such as a handset or headset. Below is the pinout of the AUDIO connector when looking into the receptacle.  More

  1. GND
    Ground
  2. SPK
    Speaker
  3. PTT
    Push-to-Talk
  4. MIC
    Microphone
  5. ?
  6. ?
FILL
To the right of the AUDIO connector is a 6-pin U-229 connector (actually an U-283/U male panel mount) for connection of a data device (e.g. a personal computer or a message terminal) or a DS-102 FILL device, such as the KYK-13. Below is the pinout of the connector in FILL mode.  More

  1. GND
    Ground
  2. SWG
    Switched ground
  3. ACK
    Fill request acknowledgment
  4. DATA
    Fill data into KY-99
  5. CLK
    Fill clock into KY-99
  6. ?
Data
The rightmost U-229 connector can also be used for connection of a DATA device, such as a personal computer or a message terminal. In that case, the pinout is as shown below.  More

  1. GND
    Ground
  2. RXD
    Data from radio
  3. PTT
    Grounded when transmitting
  4. CLK
    Clock out (synchronous mode) or TXD (analogue) 1
  5. DIG
    Digital data mode select 2
  6. TXD
    Data into radio 3
  1. In Analog mode, this pin is used as input for the data tones. Analog mode is selected by grounding pin F. This probably bypasses any filtering in the audio path of the transceiver. In synchronous digital data mode, this pin carries the clock signal (CLK).
  2. The excact functionality of this pin is currently unknown. Grounding this pin seems to select digital (data) mode. When both pin E and F are high-impedance (default) analog voice mode is selected.
  3. In digital mode, this pin is used as the DATA input (into the radio). When pin F is grounded, analog data mode (i.e. tones) is selected.

KY-99 power
Below is the pinout of the power connector at the rear of the KY-99A when looking into the re­cep­tacle. The pin numbers are printed inside the receptacle. The device is suitable for connection of a BA-590 battery pack (or equivalent), which consists of two individually wired 12V batteries. As the KY-99A should be powered by 17 to 40V/DC, the receptacle is internally wired in such a way — pin 2 is connected to pin 4 — that the two 12V batteries are connected in series. When the device is used with an external 24V source, power should be applied to pins 1 (0V) and 5 (+24V).

  1. 0V (1)
    0V
  2. 0V (2)
  3. unused
  4. +12V (1)
  5. +12V (2)
    +24V
  6. unused
    Power connector at the rear of the KY-99 when looking into the male receptable.
HYP-57 Power
The HYP-57 adapber box is a simple device that converts the standard 5-pin 24V power wiring of a military vehicle to the 6-pin connector of the KY-99. Below is the The wiring of the 5-pin receptacle at the rear of the HYP-57, when looking into the receptacle.

  1. +24V
    White
  2. 0V
    Black
  3. unused
  4. +24V
    Not used in supplied cable
  5. unused
    Power connector at the rear of the HYP-57 adapter when looking into the male receptable.
Radio
At the bottom left of the front panel of the KY-99 is a 13-pin receptacle for the cable that connects the unit to a compatible radio. This cable might be different for each type of radio, but most will be connected to a 5-pin U-229 connector. Below is the pinout of the radio connector of the KY-99, when looking into the receptacle. The numbers are also printed inside the receptacle. The shield of the cable is connected at both ends to the metal of the connector (CHASSIS).

  1. GND
    0V
  2. AIN
    Audio input (from radio SPK)
  3. PTT
    Push-To-Talk
  4. GND
    0V
  5. AOUT
    Fixed level audio out (to radio MIC)
  6. GND
    0V
  7. RXD
    Receive Data 1
  8. RXC
    External TX, RX Clock 1
  9. TXD
    Transmit Data 1
  10. TXC
    Internal TX Clock 1
  11. CTS
    Clear To Send 1
  12. LOSSEL
    Line-Of-Sight Select 1
  13. ?
    13-pin radio connector at the front of the KY-99 when looking into the male receptacle.
The radio connector is from the MIL-DTL-38999 Series I family.  Datasheet

  1. The direction of lines 7 to 13 is currently unknown.

Specifications
KY-99, KY-99A
  • Device
    Voice and data encryption unit
  • Purpose
    Secure speech and data over HF, VHF and UHF radio
  • Model
    KY-99, KY-99A
  • Name
    MINTERM
  • Years
    1994-2006
  • Family
    ANDVT
  • Developer
    NSA
  • Manufactuer
    ITT
  • NSN
    5810-00-391-0187
  • Predecessor
    KY-65 marrowband, KY-57 (VINSON) wideband
  • Successor
    KY-99M
  • Compatibility
    ANDVT, VINSON, MILSTAR, SINCGARS, SINCGARS ICOM
  • Encryption
    SAVILLE
  • FILL
    DS-102 (EKMS-608), NSA Type 1 (Suite A), OTAR, OTAD
  • Channels
    1, half-duplex, narrowband/wideband
  • Vocoder
    Narrowband: LPC-10e (v53)
    Wideband: CVSD (12, 16 kb/s)
  • Data
    Narrowband: 300, 600, 1200, 2400 baud with FEC
    Wideband: 12, 16 kbaud
    SINCGARS: 75, 150, 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800 baud via DRA
  • Modem
    HF: QPSK multitone: 39 tones (voice), 16 tones (data)
    LOS: DQPSK single-tone FED-STD-1005
    Wireline adapter
  • Radio port
    Digital, Analogue (-21 to 0 dBm)
  • Display
    8-position LED dot-matrix
  • Power
    17-40V/DC (typically 24V, e.g. 2 × 12V in series)
  • Consumption
    2.5W
  • Battery
    BA-590, BA-5590, BA-3590, or equivalent
  • Backup
    6V, BA-1372/U, BA-5372
  • Temperature
    -46°C to +70°C (-57°C to +71°C)
  • Humidity
    95%
  • Immersion
    90 cm
  • Altitude
    4.6 km (12 km)
  • Dimensions
    200 × 140 × 77 mm
  • Weight
    1856 g
  • Price
    US$ 6207 in 2008 [2]
  • Quantity
    40,000 by 2008 [2]
KY-99M
  • Device
    Modernised version of KY-99A
  • Purpose
    Drop-in replacment for KY-99A
  • Model
    KY-99M
  • Years
    2014-2021
  • NSN
    5810-01-617-4671
  • Manufacturer
    Raytheon
  • Price
    US$ 6838 in 2018
Features
  • Low-power
  • Lightweight
  • Single channel
  • Half-duplex
  • Narrowband, wideband or wireline
  • Secure voice and data (simultaneously)
  • Full key distribution (OTAD)
  • Over-the-air rekeying (OTAR)
  • VINSON (KY-57/58) legacy mode
  • Improved SATCOM performance, improved synchronisation
  • Improved LPC-10e voice coding algorithm (V58), 2400 baud
  • CVSD voice coding, at 12 and 16 kbps (wideband)
  • MILSTAR compatible
Ancillaries
  • HYP-57
    5810-01-026-9621   Vehicular Power Supply
  • HYX-57
    5810-01-026-9622   Wireline Adapter B16
  • MT-4626
    5975-01-057-6524   Mounting cradle
  • LAV-25
    5895-01-467-7097   LAV-25/KY-99A mounting adapter
Compatible devices
Datasheets
  1. MIL-DTL-38999, Series I LJT, II JT, III TV
    This is the RADIO connector on the front panel of the KY-99.
    Amphenol Aerospace. Undated. Retrieved April 2024.

  2. BA-5372/U backup battery
    Ultralife Corporation, 2011.
Documentation
  1. (U) Field generation and Over-The-Air Distribution of COMSEC key in support of tactical operations and exercises. (U) Handling instructions.
    NAG-16F. NSA, May 2001. Page F1. UNCLAS/FOUO.

  2. TM 09726-13
    WANTED
References
  1. Naval Research Laboratory,
    Fulfilling the Roosevelts' Vision for American Naval Power (1923-2003)

    30 June 2006 p. 39 (approved for public release)

  2. Naval Research Laboratory,
    Fulfilling the Roosevelts' Vision for American Naval Power (1923-2003)

    30 June 2006 p. 65 (approved for public release)

  3. NRL and the Advanced Narrowband Secure Voice Terminal
    Timeline of the ANDVT development. Undated.

  4. Tim Weichel, Experience
    Certificate of the MINTERM full maintenance course. July-August 1992.
    Retrieved November 2009 from http://www.timweichel.com/.

  5. Brooke Clarke, KY-99 Advanced Narrowband Digital Voice Terminal (ANDVT)
    Website PRC68. 2009.

  6. GovTribe, VINSON/ANDVT Cryptographic Modernization (VACM) Production
    24 April 2013.

  7. GovTribe, VACM Notice of Proposed Contract Action
    20 August 2014.

  8. John Keller, Raytheon to provide cyber security and
    cryptographic capability for secure voice communications

    Military+Aerospace Electronics, 20 December 2016.

  9. Wikipedia, MILSTAR
    Visited 22 April 2024.
Further information
Other websites
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Crypto Museum. Created: Thursday 30 August 2012. Last changed: Monday, 13 May 2024 - 13:48 CET.
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