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Puck
Diode used as bug simulator

Over the years, a wide variety of bug detectors, direction finders and bug tracers have been developed. Although it is relatively easy to locate a bug that is transmitting permanently, new generation bugs are often remote controlled, so that they can be turned off when not needed.
 
Furthermore, bugs can be voice activated (VOX) or controlled by another piece of equipment, such as a public addressing system (PA), in which case the bug is likely to be turned off when the room is checked for bugs (bug sweep).

In such cases, the only way to detect a bug is by using a so-called non-linear junction detector (NLJD), such as the Audiotel Scanlock Broom. An NLJD is capable of finding bugs that are switched off completely, by detecting the PN-junctions that are present in all semiconductors, such as transistors, diodes and computer chips.
  
The Audiotel PUCK, a test diode acting as a dummy bug

By exiting the PN-junction of a semiconductor with a strong RF signal of a certain frequency, the semiconductor will produce harmonics of that frequency. By looking the 2nd and 3rd harmonics reflected by an object, the NLJD will be able to detect an electronic device. As the amount of energy reflected by a miniature electronic circuit is extremely low, the quality of the NLJD and its filtering is of the usmost importance, and requires a well-trained and capable operator.

As it is necessary for the operator to train his skills regularly, Audiotel produced a dummy bug in the shape of a hockey puck. The puck is made of plexiglass and carries just a schottky diode at the center. The diode is not connected to anything and its wires act as antennas.
 
The Audiotel PUCK, a test diode acting as a dummy bug The puck in the palm of a hand Top view of the PUCK The puck, a diode acting as a dummy bug Close-up of the unconnected diode Close-up of the unconnected diode

 
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Crypto Museum. Last changed: Friday, 04 September 2015 - 19:45 CET.
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